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Scott answers your questions - round 33 - 1/2/07

 
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kirk95
StarShip Captain


Joined: 14 May 2004
Posts: 278
Location: Boulder, CO

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 3:09 pm    Post subject: Scott answers your questions - round 33 - 1/2/07 Reply with quote

Hi Scott!
Thanks for the show in Buenos Aires last nigth!! It was fucking awesome!!
I really missed the Kirk's voice and his jokes, but as you said, Alan plays his ass off. The kid is doing the job!! He's a cat too!!
The trio's work was perfect!
The organization's work was fucking bad, beacause Kirk was anounced for the ticket's sales. The support act, was a pice of shit. Diego Mizrahi sucks. He allways said that he was your student a lot of years ago. Probably he don't understood anything. And the last point...I was so wondered how the organization puts Randall and Electro Vox cabs (they are made in Argentina) and they dont sound so good. We lost a lot of the sound. If only they where putting a marshall cabs and a Hartkee or Ampeg cabs for the bass, the sound could be better.
Thanks for let me say that, and sorry for my bad english.
See you next tour!!
Bye

Quote:
Thanks, it's always great to play in Buenos Aires. Actually the Randall cabinet had Greenbacks in it and sounded better than the Marshall cabinets with 75 watt speakers, which in my opinion are some of the worst speakers ever made.



Heyyyy scott!!
nico from argentina here

thanks for the 2 awesome shows man....
we really enjoyed your music and your magic
and thank you for the picture.
argentina loves you scott
when are you coming back? hehe
sorry for my terrible english.
FUUUUCKIN AWWWeSOOOOME!

Quote:
Thanks!



Jb from argentina once again!
What a Show man! I went both nights, fucking amazing! You are insane dude! The trio works really well and Alan is great! And i guess you have nothing to do with Diego "i want to be satriani/vai and try steal some hendersons licks" Mizrahi, what an ASS! Jesus! He has nothing to do there.
I was there across the street with my friends cheering you up when you got off the car and grab your guitar the second night!
You brought the Boss SE70, the Red Shure and the Shure head, what other gear? what about those Randall? Diego shit head gave`em to you?
Nairobe Express!! Yeah VTT 2! John is a monster player! My bass player friend Albert , wich is a Victor fan, was amazed!
I don`t want to be a pain in the ass, but what happened with kirk? You`ve just decided that no more vocals and that`s it? or you guys had a fight or something? Because it looked like something happened in the middle of the tour, even the website still has the pic of kirk in the Blues Band. Belive me i know that band relations are difficult. But Alan played his ass off! i agree...
It was like a Blues band totaly on acid! It was insane man! Thanx for being here... Was a great experience after all this years of listening to the records!


Quote:
Blues band on acid is a nice description, thanks! I bring my head, pedals and FX so all I have to rent is the cabinet. The change in drummers happened just a couple weeks before the tour so there wasn't time enough to get Alan's name on the promo.



Hey Scott, Did you really give Kurt the boot from the trio?

Quote:
Yeah, Kirk is out.


Would you still
play with Kurt in Scott Kinseys band?

Quote:
Gary Novak is the drummer in Kinsey's band, not Kirk.


Have you ever head guitarist John Ziegler play?

Quote:
John Z's a good player and a good friend of mine. I met him in Houston when Tribal Tech used to play at Rockefellers. He leads a jam session every Monday night at the Baked Potato, and Kirk plays keyboards sometimes in John's band Volto, with Danny Carey from Tool on drums.



Hey Scott

First off, how do you look at the fretboard? Currently I know all the modes and I am pretty confident about them all over the neck, but I am tired of seing positions. I just are overwhelmed by the fact that if I will start seing things in notes rather then positions, I need to know: all the notes on the guitar neck, what notes every scale consist off (for example in a F# mixolydian), and I need to know how each chord is build up (I know that, but I just know them out of positions), not by for example 1, b3, 5 and so on, but knowing what notes there is in for example a C#aug7. To me this is very overwhelming.

If I come to the point where I just play thinking of the notes, not positions at all, won´t it be very difficult to improvise up tempo?? I know this approach would free me up and make me understand more why people choose the notes as they do and I would more easily be able to understand for example pat martino´s solos and incorporate his ideas into my own playing.

Please, I would really appreciate if you could helped me out giving me tips on how to approach learning this massive ammount of the things I mentioned above. I just try to imagine how hard it must be to learn just one chord, like learning for example what notes Cmaj7, Gmaj7, D#maj7 consist of..an doing this in so many keys and there is so many chords and scales to learn.
Ionian in all keys, Dorian in all keys, Phrygian in all keys...it is so insane.

Again, if you please have some advice on maybe how you tackled it and give me some help. This would be much appreciated.


Quote:
When we were kids we learned the multiplication tables up to 12, and I don't remember it being all that hard. Learning 12 notes in 12 keys takes the same amount of brain power, and if kids can do it, how hard can it be? The guitar however is more difficult than most instruments since we've got so many duplicated notes, but if you just take it one string at a time it's not that hard. There's an exercise for this in round 27 that would be good for you to try. To answer your question, seeing individual notes is important for choosing the best notes to play over changes, especially when playing motifs, and the scales and positions help develop technique and lines. It's all good.



Hey scott!

i'm a guy from chile, and i just want to thank you for all the inspiration...all your work on the guitar is amazing, thanks for your music, and for to be the great person you are...

the clinic you did in chile was incredible...you really motivate me to work harder and to be the best guitar player i can..

Thank you and hope to see you soon here in chile!!


Quote:
Thanks!




Hi Scott !!!! I'm from Italy and my name is Joe....i think you are really the best player in the world !!!!...and your sound is perfect !!!!
I have a question for you:
what do you think about the "Maxon od808" and the "keeley ts9 mod plus" ?...have you ever tried one of them ?
It' s very important for me to know your answer, please !!!! : )


Quote:
I've never heard the Keely mod, but I've tried the Maxon od808 and I think their OD-9 sounds much better.



Hi Scott,

First of all thanks for answer my questions, and second of all is needless to say that I love your playng and you are an inspiration to me:
Few questions:

Have you try the Ultimate Octave by Fulltone?

Quote:
Yes, I like the Octafuzz much more.


Boss SE-70 what effect do you use of it? If broke would you purchase another one?

Quote:
I use it mainly for delay, but for a lot of other sounds too. I have a few SE-70's just in case.


How did you get the Arion Chorus with True bypass mode?
Quote:
It was modded by Prosound Communications Inc.


Regarding the reverb do you use the the SE-70? If yes what is your opinion about the reverbs who came with the amp.?

Quote:
The reverb in the SE-70 isn't very good. I use mainly delays on stage. Are you asking me if I like the sound of spring reverb which comes with amps? Not much.


Did you try any of the amp. emulator by Tech 21 NYC?

Quote:
No.


I pic at you website and I notice in your gear you do not show the Ibanez TS-9, the BB Preamp or the CE-2 Chorus, wath append did you change something?

Quote:
They're good pedals, I'm just not using them live right now.


I love the Z Vex pedal wath you think of the Ringtone?

Quote:
It's cool.


What gear you used when you played with Players? I love your guitar sound I think was one of the best sound you have.

Quote:
That was a Peavey Special 130 preamp through a tube power amp - I don't remember which one.


Last one have you done any work or studing with Don Mock?

Quote:
Just talked to him on the phone the other day. Yes, I learned a lot from him when I studied at GIT. He produced both of my instructional videos, which are finally being re-released on DVD by Alfred Publishing.


Any chance to see you in Boston??

Quote:
We might try an east coast tour in 2007.


Sorry for all the questions, but I finaly understud how to leave a message.

Thank You
Alex


Hi Scott...
Thanks for your music... in one word...greatĦĦĦĦ.... Thanks for your awesome workshop at our school and thanks for the big lesson you gave us... have fun with music ĦĦĦĦ... It was an honor to meet you and hear it alive... Thanks in the name of all my students, really ... thanks manĦĦĦ great show, great bandĦĦĦ
Thanks to be a nice guy also... I'm still laughing with the joke of a comedian guy you told me...(the faithfull who loves his wife but... you know...)...
I want to ask you about rhythm changes... did you studied them in a deeper way and in bop tempos?... do you consider them important to learn jazz language?...

Thanks again.
Ignacio from Chile


Quote:
Thanks Ignacio, and thanks for all your help and support in Chile! Well, I'm the wrong guy to ask about rhythm changes since I pretty much suck at them. I just haven't spent enough time playing them to be great at it. But I would say if you want to sound like a real be-bop jazz guitarist you should probably spend some time with that vocabulary. So this is a perfect example of a teacher saying to his student "do what I say, not what I do."



Hey Scott! Big fan of yours from Sweden here. I remember seeing you live in Fasching about 2-3 years ago i think. And i remember you guys seemed to be totally pissed off at each other. Wanna let us know what the deal was there? or is it private?
Anyways, love your playing, keep it up!


Quote:
I remember that gig very well and we weren't pissed at each other - I was pissed because someone stole my Octavia out of the dressing room. Thanks to an ex-student who saw the guy take it, I got it back at the end of the night. Sorry I looked pissed off on stage.



Hi. Scott.

Another user from Sweden here. I've been listening to you play since 1993 when i was 13. It was actually listening to you that made me look into jazz harmony at that age. Thanks for that. A few years later I saw you att fasching sweden. It was a great experence for me. Have seen you every time you have come to sweden since that. I have some questions for you if you don't mind:

1. I know you use the Boss CE-2 pedal. What do you think of the Ibanez-CS9 ? Have you tried it? Is there any specific reasons that you choose the Boss instead of the Ibanez CS-9.

Quote:
I've never tried the Ibanez.


2. What do you think of the Boss DD pedals like Boss DD-6?

Quote:
Sorry, never tried those either.


3. What are your settings for the Maxon OD-9 pedal?

Quote:
Volume all the way up, gain about 2 o'cock, tone about 11 o'clock.


4. Is there any chance that you will be touring with Thelma again?

Quote:
I've never toured with Thelma. She only flies business class, so that ended that idea real quick.


5. Dogs lifes are too short. How do you stand losing them? As a former dog owner I have a hard time getting a new one because I have a hard time dealing with the fact that in ten years or so.
Thanks in advance. As others before me I too apologize for my bad english.


Quote:
Those are the hardest times in my life, but what helps me is knowing what a great life they've had considering that there are so many dogs in the world that are homeless and unloved.


Hi Scott
What happened to your web site?
You use to have the best gear section that listed what you used on each album.
Thanks
Quote:
We took that down cause we just figured that everyone had already seen it. I'm not using the Bradshaw rig anymore, in fact it's for sale on the gear page site.


Seasons Greetings.

Roger Mayer - Voodoo 1 - Have you tried it and what do you think? Is this something like the BB Preamp? How would you compare them? Thanks and happy new year.

Quote:
I use to use the Voodoo 1 as a boost pedal with the volume all the way up and gain all the way down (Mike Landau still uses it for his boost pedal) and in combination with a Tube Screamer for my hi gain tone. Now I use an RC Booster for my boost pedal and a Maxon SD9 instead of the Voodoo/Tube Screamer combo. As a distortion pedal by itself, the Voodoo 1 is pretty thin sounding. You're better off with a BB or an SD9.


This is a little long, sorry about that.
First off, are you familiar with a guitarist named Steve Kimock? Below is an excerpt from an interview. The reason I posted it here is related to my question, which is...Is this a similar process to how you arrived at where you are today? Myself being someone who (before I even found this list) used to play an Ibanez with .009's and used extensive legato. But then bought a strat (actual Fender kind), and raised the action as high as it can be. Again, sorry about the length, but it seemed a bit more than coincidence that all three of us sort of ended up in similar boats, so to speak.

SK: I remember getting my Franz metronome as a kid, and there's this little booklet, you know with tips about using the metronome. And one of the first tips was, "Avoid immature rapidity." And I kind of said, "Oh, Fuck YOU! You mean I don't set the thing at 208 and go?" [Laughs loudly]

Well, you know the rate of information thing [speed of playing], for me, kind of lost a little psychic battle to a couple of things. One was just the general concept of Zen that I brought in to the thing. You know, I read the Zen archer stuff and got the idea of the guitar as the bow, where it's impossible to lift and impossible to draw, and the target is impossibly far off. And you pick the thing up that you can't pick up and you pull it to a tension that you can't pull it to and you aim at something you can't possibly see it's so far off. And so I said to myself, "OK," so rather than having all this information equally accessible, I went to making it equally inaccessible. I put the action [the height of the strings from the neck] as high as I possibly could and put the heaviest strings I possibly could. I completely crippled the thing. So if I wanted to play a note, I'd really want to have to play it, and it was really gonna hurt. So that slowed me down. And that made it all a lot more interesting for me. It also brought the sonic thing [his now well-known focus on tone], more to the foreground, and also created some space in my playing.

Mike Babyak: So in some sense, maybe the facility, the speed, was getting in the way of the music?

I think there's a lot of people--myself to a certain extent--that get caught a little later, realizing that the majority of their trip was that you just happened to be clever with your hands as a youth. That's neat, but so what? I mean, yeah, people make careers out of it, and perhaps to some extent I did.

And you know, another real important dynamic in the thing -you mentioned editing before--that's kind of along the lines of what happened. I think along the way you're kind of reduced to what you're doing. You're not building up to something, you're stripping things away to some essential place. That may be the entire thing, really, the stripping away.
_________________
"Ya blouse wearing poodle walker."
~Groundskeeper Willie~

Quote:
I had my romance with speed and technique mostly in the 80's. I was playing with guys like Jeff Berlin and Chick Corea and the music was difficult - lots of fast lines and tempos. But after playing with Joe Zawinul for three years and after discovering who I am as a composer, I realized that fast technique is about the least interesting thing in music for me. I respect the guys that can do it, because it takes a lot of work to attain those kind of chops, but music that sounds like it's all about technique isn't for me. That doesn't mean that I never want to play fast, it just means that I don't want the focus of my music to be about chops.


Hey Scott,
Why and when did you decide to use the tremolo bar extensively? It's very unique. Thanks!

Quote:
I've been using the bar a lot since I first picked up a strat in '75, but over the last ten years or so I've been holding the bar in my hand as I play and phrasing more like a slide guitar player.



Hi,

First off, thanks soo much for coming to the u.k. I imagine touring arrangements and money etc can make things difficult and possibly miserable, but its was great to see you live. Its up there with seeing Herbie Hancock for me. I got one of the engineers to get you from back stage after the gig and you came and signed a cd and let me take a photo, my freinds were stunned when i told them. Awsome gig.

1, A slightly generic question but, when you were younger was there a moment when you consciously decided you were gonna play guitar for a job? Did you consider session work at all? IM at music school and the moment and i feel alot of pressure worrying about how im gonna make a living.

Quote:
I knew I wanted to play guitar for a living when I was a little kid. I started out playing covers in clubs 5 or 6 nights a week and I did that for about 10 years. I got to solo a lot but I didn't care for most of the music I had to play. My goal was to do the same thing, only playing my own music instead of covers. I never had much of a desire to be a studio musician because I figured the music I'd have to play would probably be as bad or worse than the shit I was already playing, so I moved to LA to try to get hired by bandleaders who were doing their own music, and luckily I got some good gigs which helped me on my way to doing my own thing.


2, what do you make of the ethics of youtube?

Quote:
I think the artist should have the final say about which clips he wants on the internet. If I find clips of mine that sound terrible, or if I think the performance wasn't that great, I ask to have them removed, and so far the people who put them up have been really nice about it.


3, check out the comedy 'garth marenghi's dark place' on youtube. Its incredibly funny, possibly the funniest british comedy in years(dont know whether that means anything though..).
Thanks for answering questions and good look with the future.
p.s i think you need to spend less time on music and more time *High voice*on that novel youve been writting..._________________
Writting numbers in the desert sand.

Scott, three-fold question:
While working in a music store, I met many gifted clients who I now have contact with and plan on starting a fusion/blues/world music kind of band. Unfortunately, many of them are extremely religious. In fact, one guy (a monster drummer) happens to be a minister, and after saying he wanted to form a mahavishnu/zeppelin type of band he later somehow added in "with inspirational lyrics." Turns out the dude is also a minister and his voicemail ends with "this is the day the lord has made, rejoice and be glad."

My metaphysical outlook is pretty much dead on with yours. Avoid these people like the plague, or try to make music with them, with religion out of the picture?

Quote:
Religious people can be cool to work with if a) they're not evangelists and don't try to convert you (this is rare) or b) they're not offended by your personality or actions. (also rare)


Another drummer, also religious said he is playing at some hotel doing latin, fusion and SMOOTH JAZZ. I told him it ain't my bag and he tells me to "open my mind, that kind of music pays the bills sometimes."
Avoid like the plague?

Quote:
I played top 40 for ten years to pay the bills so who am I to criticize.... but smooth jazz has gotta be the most humiliating way to make a living. Why not just get your balls chopped off.


Lastly, what recommendations would you give to a young player who wants to play your kind of (uncommercial) music, in a market that isn't necessarily the most fertile (minneapolis) without music school connections/credentials? Move? Join a smooth jazz band ?

Quote:
Trying to make a living playing uncommercial music is definitely hard. More than likely the size of the audience in just one city for what you're doing isn't enough to support you. That's why it's important to try to reach out to labels or put out your own record to get more fans outside of where you live. There's no way I could make a living playing my music only in LA - touring pays my bills.

_________________
www.online-discussion.com


Last edited by kirk95 on Thu Mar 03, 2011 1:51 am; edited 1 time in total
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Posts: 15

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 2:19 am    Post subject: Re: Scott answers your questions - round 33 - 1/2/07 New Reply with quote

Would you still
play with Kurt in Scott Kinseys band?


Quote:
Gary Novak is the drummer in Kinsey's band, not Kirk.


Just watched Kinsey's band at the Potato last Nov. and Kirt was on drums.
What i meant was would Scott play in Kinsey's band when Kirt
is a sub. Kinsey gets a lot of subs because Novak is such a great drummer
and tours alot with differen't people.
http://www.thebakedpotato.com/november_06.htm
The Baked Potato Calendar


Have you ever head guitarist John Ziegler play?

Quote:
John Z's a good player and a good friend of mine. I met him in Houston when Tribal Tech used to play at Rockefellers. He leads a jam session every Monday night at the Baked Potato, and Kirk plays keyboards sometimes in John's band Volto, with Danny Carey from Tool on drums.



Hey Scott

First off, how do you look at the fretboard? Currently I know all the modes and I am pretty confident about them all over the neck, but I am tired of seing positions. I just are overwhelmed by the fact that if I will start seing things in notes rather then positions, I need to know: all the notes on the guitar neck, what notes every scale consist off (for example in a F# mixolydian), and I need to know how each chord is build up (I know that, but I just know them out of positions), not by for example 1, b3, 5 and so on, but knowing what notes there is in for example a C#aug7. To me this is very overwhelming.

If I come to the point where I just play thinking of the notes, not positions at all, won´t it be very difficult to improvise up tempo?? I know this approach would free me up and make me understand more why people choose the notes as they do and I would more easily be able to understand for example pat martino´s solos and incorporate his ideas into my own playing.

Please, I would really appreciate if you could helped me out giving me tips on how to approach learning this massive ammount of the things I mentioned above. I just try to imagine how hard it must be to learn just one chord, like learning for example what notes Cmaj7, Gmaj7, D#maj7 consist of..an doing this in so many keys and there is so many chords and scales to learn.
Ionian in all keys, Dorian in all keys, Phrygian in all keys...it is so insane.

Again, if you please have some advice on maybe how you tackled it and give me some help. This would be much appreciated.


Quote:
When we were kids we learned the multiplication tables up to 12, and I don't remember it being all that hard. Learning 12 notes in 12 keys takes the same amount of brain power, and if kids can do it, how hard can it be? The guitar however is more difficult than most instruments since we've got so many duplicated notes, but if you just take it one string at a time it's not that hard. There's an exercise for this in round 27 that would be good for you to try. To answer your question, seeing individual notes is important for choosing the best notes to play over changes, especially when playing motifs, and the scales and positions help develop technique and lines. It's all good.



Hey scott!

i'm a guy from chile, and i just want to thank you for all the inspiration...all your work on the guitar is amazing, thanks for your music, and for to be the great person you are...

the clinic you did in chile was incredible...you really motivate me to work harder and to be the best guitar player i can..

Thank you and hope to see you soon here in chile!!


Quote:
Thanks!




Hi Scott !!!! I'm from Italy and my name is Joe....i think you are really the best player in the world !!!!...and your sound is perfect !!!!
I have a question for you:
what do you think about the "Maxon od808" and the "keeley ts9 mod plus" ?...have you ever tried one of them ?
It' s very important for me to know your answer, please !!!! : )


Quote:
I've never heard the Keely mod, but I've tried the Maxon od808 and I think their OD-9 sounds much better.



Hi Scott,

First of all thanks for answer my questions, and second of all is needless to say that I love your playng and you are an inspiration to me:
Few questions:

Have you try the Ultimate Octave by Fulltone?

Quote:
Yes, I like the Octafuzz much more.


Boss SE-70 what effect do you use of it? If broke would you purchase another one?

Quote:
I use it mainly for delay, but for a lot of other sounds too. I have a few SE-70's just in case.


How did you get the Arion Chorus with True bypass mode?
Quote:
It was modded by Prosound Communications Inc.


Regarding the reverb do you use the the SE-70? If yes what is your opinion about the reverbs who came with the amp.?

Quote:
The reverb in the SE-70 isn't very good. I use mainly delays on stage. Are you asking me if I like the sound of spring reverb which comes with amps? Not much.


Did you try any of the amp. emulator by Tech 21 NYC?

Quote:
No.


I pic at you website and I notice in your gear you do not show the Ibanez TS-9, the BB Preamp or the CE-2 Chorus, wath append did you change something?

Quote:
They're good pedals, I'm just not using them live right now.


I love the Z Vex pedal wath you think of the Ringtone?

Quote:
It's cool.


What gear you used when you played with Players? I love your guitar sound I think was one of the best sound you have.

Quote:
That was a Peavey Special 130 preamp through a tube power amp - I don't remember which one.


Last one have you done any work or studing with Don Mock?

Quote:
Just talked to him on the phone the other day. Yes, I learned a lot from him when I studied at GIT. He produced both of my instructional videos, which are finally being re-released on DVD by Alfred Publishing.


Any chance to see you in Boston??

Quote:
We might try an east coast tour in 2007.


Sorry for all the questions, but I finaly understud how to leave a message.

Thank You
Alex


Hi Scott...
Thanks for your music... in one word...greatĦĦĦĦ.... Thanks for your awesome workshop at our school and thanks for the big lesson you gave us... have fun with music ĦĦĦĦ... It was an honor to meet you and hear it alive... Thanks in the name of all my students, really ... thanks manĦĦĦ great show, great bandĦĦĦ
Thanks to be a nice guy also... I'm still laughing with the joke of a comedian guy you told me...(the faithfull who loves his wife but... you know...)...
I want to ask you about rhythm changes... did you studied them in a deeper way and in bop tempos?... do you consider them important to learn jazz language?...

Thanks again.
Ignacio from Chile


Quote:
Thanks Ignacio, and thanks for all your help and support in Chile! Well, I'm the wrong guy to ask about rhythm changes since I pretty much suck at them. I just haven't spent enough time playing them to be great at it. But I would say if you want to sound like a real be-bop jazz guitarist you should probably spend some time with that vocabulary. So this is a perfect example of a teacher saying to his student "do what I say, not what I do."



Hey Scott! Big fan of yours from Sweden here. I remember seeing you live in Fasching about 2-3 years ago i think. And i remember you guys seemed to be totally pissed off at each other. Wanna let us know what the deal was there? or is it private?
Anyways, love your playing, keep it up!


Quote:
I remember that gig very well and we weren't pissed at each other - I was pissed because someone stole my Octavia out of the dressing room. Thanks to an ex-student who saw the guy take it, I got it back at the end of the night. Sorry I looked pissed off on stage.



Hi. Scott.

Another user from Sweden here. I've been listening to you play since 1993 when i was 13. It was actually listening to you that made me look into jazz harmony at that age. Thanks for that. A few years later I saw you att fasching sweden. It was a great experence for me. Have seen you every time you have come to sweden since that. I have some questions for you if you don't mind:

1. I know you use the Boss CE-2 pedal. What do you think of the Ibanez-CS9 ? Have you tried it? Is there any specific reasons that you choose the Boss instead of the Ibanez CS-9.

Quote:
I've never tried the Ibanez.


2. What do you think of the Boss DD pedals like Boss DD-6?

Quote:
Sorry, never tried those either.


3. What are your settings for the Maxon OD-9 pedal?

Quote:
Volume all the way up, gain about 2 o'cock, tone about 11 o'clock.


4. Is there any chance that you will be touring with Thelma again?

Quote:
I've never toured with Thelma. She only flies business class, so that ended that idea real quick.


5. Dogs lifes are too short. How do you stand losing them? As a former dog owner I have a hard time getting a new one because I have a hard time dealing with the fact that in ten years or so.
Thanks in advance. As others before me I too apologize for my bad english.


Quote:
Those are the hardest times in my life, but what helps me is knowing what a great life they've had considering that there are so many dogs in the world that are homeless and unloved.


Hi Scott
What happened to your web site?
You use to have the best gear section that listed what you used on each album.
Thanks
Quote:
We took that down cause we just figured that everyone had already seen it. I'm not using the Bradshaw rig anymore, in fact it's for sale on the gear page site.


Seasons Greetings.

Roger Mayer - Voodoo 1 - Have you tried it and what do you think? Is this something like the BB Preamp? How would you compare them? Thanks and happy new year.

Quote:
I use to use the Voodoo 1 as a boost pedal with the volume all the way up and gain all the way down (Mike Landau still uses it for his boost pedal) and in combination with a Tube Screamer for my hi gain tone. Now I use an RC Booster for my boost pedal and a Maxon SD9 instead of the Voodoo/Tube Screamer combo. As a distortion pedal by itself, the Voodoo 1 is pretty thin sounding. You're better off with a BB or an SD9.


This is a little long, sorry about that.
First off, are you familiar with a guitarist named Steve Kimock? Below is an excerpt from an interview. The reason I posted it here is related to my question, which is...Is this a similar process to how you arrived at where you are today? Myself being someone who (before I even found this list) used to play an Ibanez with .009's and used extensive legato. But then bought a strat (actual Fender kind), and raised the action as high as it can be. Again, sorry about the length, but it seemed a bit more than coincidence that all three of us sort of ended up in similar boats, so to speak.

SK: I remember getting my Franz metronome as a kid, and there's this little booklet, you know with tips about using the metronome. And one of the first tips was, "Avoid immature rapidity." And I kind of said, "Oh, Fuck YOU! You mean I don't set the thing at 208 and go?" [Laughs loudly]

Well, you know the rate of information thing [speed of playing], for me, kind of lost a little psychic battle to a couple of things. One was just the general concept of Zen that I brought in to the thing. You know, I read the Zen archer stuff and got the idea of the guitar as the bow, where it's impossible to lift and impossible to draw, and the target is impossibly far off. And you pick the thing up that you can't pick up and you pull it to a tension that you can't pull it to and you aim at something you can't possibly see it's so far off. And so I said to myself, "OK," so rather than having all this information equally accessible, I went to making it equally inaccessible. I put the action [the height of the strings from the neck] as high as I possibly could and put the heaviest strings I possibly could. I completely crippled the thing. So if I wanted to play a note, I'd really want to have to play it, and it was really gonna hurt. So that slowed me down. And that made it all a lot more interesting for me. It also brought the sonic thing [his now well-known focus on tone], more to the foreground, and also created some space in my playing.

Mike Babyak: So in some sense, maybe the facility, the speed, was getting in the way of the music?

I think there's a lot of people--myself to a certain extent--that get caught a little later, realizing that the majority of their trip was that you just happened to be clever with your hands as a youth. That's neat, but so what? I mean, yeah, people make careers out of it, and perhaps to some extent I did.

And you know, another real important dynamic in the thing -you mentioned editing before--that's kind of along the lines of what happened. I think along the way you're kind of reduced to what you're doing. You're not building up to something, you're stripping things away to some essential place. That may be the entire thing, really, the stripping away.
_________________
"Ya blouse wearing poodle walker."
~Groundskeeper Willie~

Quote:
I had my romance with speed and technique mostly in the 80's. I was playing with guys like Jeff Berlin and Chick Corea and the music was difficult - lots of fast lines and tempos. But after playing with Joe Zawinul for three years and after discovering who I am as a composer, I realized that fast technique is about the least interesting thing in music for me. I respect the guys that can do it, because it takes a lot of work to attain those kind of chops, but music that sounds like it's all about technique isn't for me. That doesn't mean that I never want to play fast, it just means that I don't want the focus of my music to be about chops.


Hey Scott,
Why and when did you decide to use the tremolo bar extensively? It's very unique. Thanks!

Quote:
I've been using the bar a lot since I first picked up a strat in '75, but over the last ten years or so I've been holding the bar in my hand as I play and phrasing more like a slide guitar player.



Hi,

First off, thanks soo much for coming to the u.k. I imagine touring arrangements and money etc can make things difficult and possibly miserable, but its was great to see you live. Its up there with seeing Herbie Hancock for me. I got one of the engineers to get you from back stage after the gig and you came and signed a cd and let me take a photo, my freinds were stunned when i told them. Awsome gig.

1, A slightly generic question but, when you were younger was there a moment when you consciously decided you were gonna play guitar for a job? Did you consider session work at all? IM at music school and the moment and i feel alot of pressure worrying about how im gonna make a living.

Quote:
I knew I wanted to play guitar for a living when I was a little kid. I started out playing covers in clubs 5 or 6 nights a week and I did that for about 10 years. I got to solo a lot but I didn't care for most of the music I had to play. My goal was to do the same thing, only playing my own music instead of covers. I never had much of a desire to be a studio musician because I figured the music I'd have to play would probably be as bad or worse than the shit I was already playing, so I moved to LA to try to get hired by bandleaders who were doing their own music, and luckily I got some good gigs which helped me on my way to doing my own thing.


2, what do you make of the ethics of youtube?

Quote:
I think the artist should have the final say about which clips he wants on the internet. If I find clips of mine that sound terrible, or if I think the performance wasn't that great, I ask to have them removed, and so far the people who put them up have been really nice about it.


3, check out the comedy 'garth marenghi's dark place' on youtube. Its incredibly funny, possibly the funniest british comedy in years(dont know whether that means anything though..).
Thanks for answering questions and good look with the future.
p.s i think you need to spend less time on music and more time *High voice*on that novel youve been writting..._________________
Writting numbers in the desert sand.

Scott, three-fold question:
While working in a music store, I met many gifted clients who I now have contact with and plan on starting a fusion/blues/world music kind of band. Unfortunately, many of them are extremely religious. In fact, one guy (a monster drummer) happens to be a minister, and after saying he wanted to form a mahavishnu/zeppelin type of band he later somehow added in "with inspirational lyrics." Turns out the dude is also a minister and his voicemail ends with "this is the day the lord has made, rejoice and be glad."

My metaphysical outlook is pretty much dead on with yours. Avoid these people like the plague, or try to make music with them, with religion out of the picture?

Quote:
Religious people can be cool to work with if a) they're not evangelists and don't try to convert you (this is rare) or b) they're not offended by your personality or actions. (also rare)


Another drummer, also religious said he is playing at some hotel doing latin, fusion and SMOOTH JAZZ. I told him it ain't my bag and he tells me to "open my mind, that kind of music pays the bills sometimes."
Avoid like the plague?

Quote:
I played top 40 for ten years to pay the bills so who am I to criticize.... but smooth jazz has gotta be the most humiliating way to make a living. Why not just get your balls chopped off.


Lastly, what recommendations would you give to a young player who wants to play your kind of (uncommercial) music, in a market that isn't necessarily the most fertile (minneapolis) without music school connections/credentials? Move? Join a smooth jazz band ?

Quote:
Trying to make a living playing uncommercial music is definitely hard. More than likely the size of the audience in just one city for what you're doing isn't enough to support you. That's why it's important to try to reach out to labels or put out your own record to get more fans outside of where you live. There's no way I could make a living playing my music only in LA - touring pays my bills.
[/quote]
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David Weaver



Joined: 22 Dec 2006
Posts: 2
Location: Pasadena

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 11:54 am    Post subject: Thanks! Reply with quote

Geez, Have been into your music for over 23 years now! Love every single note. You were all over everybody's shit back then too. Writing, improv, rhythmic phrasing... whatever. I listen to a lot of music.

Glad to hear those instructional vids are coming out on DVD. Very clear rhythmic ideas for practicing opened up a whole universe of concepts for me!
Did you ever notice they are all prime numbers? The licks in 5, 7, or 9 over beats in 3 or 4 tempo? It's endless..... I highly recommended to any serious student. Be warned.... you may discover 2 or 3 notes will take you a long way with some some rhythmic study. To hell with scales! After you learn and use them... of course.

Your's are definitely the most generous/informative of the guitar instructional videos. I play mostly straight ahead jazz. Hollow body shit.. your concepts in that video have been helping me to find my own voice in that genre. I've turned a head or 2 from it You're a very very generous teacher and musician! Don't know how to thank you........

Ok, drinking beers after practice.... yada yada....
First time on Scott's Website/message board. More beers! Lovin' it! One more beer.....

Seems Scott is doing very well over seas. Thank God/or something, foreigners are smarter and appreciate art and culture. We need to wake up the folks hear at home! To get Scott in NYC and Phillly, DC and make enough for a latte at Starbucks............. he would probably do it..... Lot's of great players coming from Europe, South America and Japan/Asia. It's fucking great!

Any Suggestions? Save america from stupidity/sloth tour? I'm kidding, but, us fans here at home could make this happen. Let's think about it....
U.S tour.......... or an east coast tour is a start.....I think it's high time for Scott to stir up some trouble in NYC!

Ok.. just one more beer....

dw
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Eugene



Joined: 02 Dec 2006
Posts: 16
Location: Moscow

PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:39 pm    Post subject: A message from russian fan Reply with quote

Greetings from Moscow, Scott!
I've been your biggest fan here since I first heard Illicit and Face First when it was released. Love your blues albums even more. Thank you very much for what you do and all the tips you give! A few of your tips gave me more than 4 years in the best jazz colledge of Russia!
Actually, was gonna ask if there's any chance to see you playing here 'cos I thought Russia is a bit shocking for foreigners and also jazz is not very popular here, to say the least. Checked your site and what a surprise - you're coming to Moscow for the second time, unbelievable! Couldn't get to your gigs last time but certainly not gonna miss these ones! Look, if there is any help I can give you here, I'd be very happy!. I mean, any help, I'm ready to be your guide, interpreter (my english is not bad - learned from my english and american buddies) help carrying the gear. I could give you some hand in case you're going to record your gig at Forte - I'm a sound engineer for a TV and film production/post production company here. So if you need anything just let me know and I don't mean getting paid for that, of course. my email is stratgeek@gmail.com. Cell number is +7-903-160-3418. Would be happy to hear from you!
P.S. If Kirk could, PLEASE, forward this message to Scott directly so he get's it before his gigs - that would be just great. Thanks a lot! Eugene.
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