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Cripe/Garcia tribute guitar

 
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MRiley



Joined: 02 Sep 2004
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2006 12:54 am    Post subject: Cripe/Garcia tribute guitar Reply with quote

Haven't seen this posted. Sorry if its a repeat but its a pretty sweet looking axe. Here's the link: http://www.guitardoctor.com/garcia_tribute_custom_guitar_ss1.htm
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Pinguin



Joined: 23 Feb 2006
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2006 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes looks quite nice.

The guitar maker writes:

Quote:
This guitar was not conceived as a "copy" of any particular one of Jerry Garcia's guitars. It is rather a composite of several, offering the best of features according to Jerry's specification & preference. The wide range of possible tones available in this instrument definitely capture some of his famous sound.


Famous sounds?

What does that mean? The only Dead shows i ever listened to was the last and the second last show from 1995 (Soldier fields) which is circulating as a SBD recording. Guess it is not Garciaīs best playing, but as i noticed from interviews, Garcia played the first half of his last Dead show with the best sounding guitar he ever played until he got technical problems with that guitar.

I am willing to learn, so can somebody please tell me why is sound is famous - please with examples?

Martin
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mikecornett



Joined: 06 Aug 2004
Posts: 630
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2006 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It looks like they are basically referring to the 3 pickup setup w/ the onboard preamp and unity gain buffer (for use w/ his effects, particularly the mutron). The 24fret board also deals with this.
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cogan



Joined: 26 Jul 2004
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Location: Antigua, West Indies

PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pinguin wrote:
Yes looks quite nice.

The guitar maker writes:

Quote:
This guitar was not conceived as a "copy" of any particular one of Jerry Garcia's guitars. It is rather a composite of several, offering the best of features according to Jerry's specification & preference. The wide range of possible tones available in this instrument definitely capture some of his famous sound.


Famous sounds?

What does that mean? The only Dead shows i ever listened to was the last and the second last show from 1995 (Soldier fields) which is circulating as a SBD recording. Guess it is not Garciaīs best playing, but as i noticed from interviews, Garcia played the first half of his last Dead show with the best sounding guitar he ever played until he got technical problems with that guitar.

I am willing to learn, so can somebody please tell me why is sound is famous - please with examples?

Martin


Um, I can't see much reason for discussing "why" his tone is so famous when you can buy dozens of CDs and download thousands of hours of his stuff to hear for yourself. Not trying to be a jerk, but it's kind of like trying to describe the taste of a good scotch to someone when you've got a bottle on the table in front of you. He was on the world stage for 25 years creating some of the most unique music you'll ever hear. A lot of his famous tone comes from his fingers and style, not necessarily from the guitars. It also changed a bit through the years on account of his rig being revised as he went, but the man had one of the most idiosyncratic guitar voices ever recorded; there's no mistaking it (accept maybe with those who try to copy it). In other words, and more than with any other guitarist I've ever encountered, nobody sounds just like Jerry without consciously trying to sound just like Jerry. Just give a listen. I'm partial to "Without a Net" for pure Garcia tone, but there's all kinds of different eras of it to choose from. Enjoy the listen.

Edit:

Sorry about the curt response there. I haven't been around much lately and just went looking through some other threads. I see you're from Germany, which explains the lack of familiarity with Garcia's playing. He doesn't seem to be too well known on that side of the pond. Over here in the States, *many or most* (my take on it) of the folks who have become familiar with Steve come from a music history steeped in Jerry's playing. I don't have any specific examples for you off the top of my head, but check archives.org for shows from '72, '76, '77, and '88-94 (others here will have their own favorite years). There are so many great tunes (and a few clunkers) that it's hard to give a list, but try any version of "Eyes of the World", "China Cat Sunflower/ I know you Rider", "Scarlet Begonias/Fire on the Mountain", "Jack Straw", "Dark Star", "Franklin's Tower", "Peggy-O", "Cassidy", "Brokedown Palace" or just about anything else. But, for God's sake, stay away from "Samba in the Rain", "Eternity", and "One More Saturday Night"! Wink Everyone has their favorites and their banes.

Also look through the works of the Jerry Garcia Band in its many incarnations.

Best of luck with it. I always love to see someone turned onto the Grateful Dead, particularly when they have no prior exposure to the band. It can change your life, even though seeing them live was the key to the epiphany for me.
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pelerin



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 48
Location: Earthquake country

PostPosted: Wed Mar 01, 2006 4:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cogan wrote:

<snip>
Best of luck with it. I always love to see someone turned onto the Grateful Dead, particularly when they have no prior exposure to the band. It can change your life, even though seeing them live was the key to the epiphany for me.


Yup, that is so right. However, given how long it has been since that bus stopped rolling and discharged it's passengers, I think it is a safe bet that your epiphany predates the internet. While archive.org in no way equals live at the Greek it is a far richer resource than what existed 25-30 years ago. (my window of "experience") I still have the first tape I ever got though. Those things were much harder to come by in those days.
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57tele



Joined: 29 Jun 2004
Posts: 714
Location: Durham, NC

PostPosted: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cogan wrote:
Pinguin wrote:
Yes looks quite nice.

The guitar maker writes:

Quote:
This guitar was not conceived as a "copy" of any particular one of Jerry Garcia's guitars. It is rather a composite of several, offering the best of features according to Jerry's specification & preference. The wide range of possible tones available in this instrument definitely capture some of his famous sound.


Famous sounds?

What does that mean? The only Dead shows i ever listened to was the last and the second last show from 1995 (Soldier fields) which is circulating as a SBD recording. Guess it is not Garciaīs best playing, but as i noticed from interviews, Garcia played the first half of his last Dead show with the best sounding guitar he ever played until he got technical problems with that guitar.

I am willing to learn, so can somebody please tell me why is sound is famous - please with examples?

Martin


Um, I can't see much reason for discussing "why" his tone is so famous when you can buy dozens of CDs and download thousands of hours of his stuff to hear for yourself. Not trying to be a jerk, but it's kind of like trying to describe the taste of a good scotch to someone when you've got a bottle on the table in front of you. He was on the world stage for 25 years creating some of the most unique music you'll ever hear. A lot of his famous tone comes from his fingers and style, not necessarily from the guitars. It also changed a bit through the years on account of his rig being revised as he went, but the man had one of the most idiosyncratic guitar voices ever recorded; there's no mistaking it (accept maybe with those who try to copy it). In other words, and more than with any other guitarist I've ever encountered, nobody sounds just like Jerry without consciously trying to sound just like Jerry. Just give a listen. I'm partial to "Without a Net" for pure Garcia tone, but there's all kinds of different eras of it to choose from. Enjoy the listen.

Edit:

Sorry about the curt response there. I haven't been around much lately and just went looking through some other threads. I see you're from Germany, which explains the lack of familiarity with Garcia's playing. He doesn't seem to be too well known on that side of the pond. Over here in the States, *many or most* (my take on it) of the folks who have become familiar with Steve come from a music history steeped in Jerry's playing. I don't have any specific examples for you off the top of my head, but check archives.org for shows from '72, '76, '77, and '88-94 (others here will have their own favorite years). There are so many great tunes (and a few clunkers) that it's hard to give a list, but try any version of "Eyes of the World", "China Cat Sunflower/ I know you Rider", "Scarlet Begonias/Fire on the Mountain", "Jack Straw", "Dark Star", "Franklin's Tower", "Peggy-O", "Cassidy", "Brokedown Palace" or just about anything else. But, for God's sake, stay away from "Samba in the Rain", "Eternity", and "One More Saturday Night"! Wink Everyone has their favorites and their banes.

Also look through the works of the Jerry Garcia Band in its many incarnations.

Best of luck with it. I always love to see someone turned onto the Grateful Dead, particularly when they have no prior exposure to the band. It can change your life, even though seeing them live was the key to the epiphany for me.


Even if he weren't from Germany, you have to remember that the Dead were popular among only a very distinct subset of people here, too. Go try and tell folks on, say, a jazz guitar forum that Garcia was a great player. You'll get laughed out of the place. (the same way you'll get laughed out of a classical forum if you mention Steve Howe). Why? Apart from the inherent snobbery Smile the vast majority of people don't or didn't collect live shows, which is where Garcia really stretched out. Even then, there is the argument that his place in the guitar god pantheon is somewhat exaggerated by Deadheads.
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Pinguin



Joined: 23 Feb 2006
Posts: 20

PostPosted: Wed Mar 01, 2006 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, i am more in guitar players like the early Frank Zappa (1975-77) and Joe Satriani. I also like some stuff played by Pat Metheney.

Sorry, donīt have GD cds, but downloaded 4 or 5 shows from the 1989/1990 period plus the last two GD shows from 1995 but only listened to the last 1995 concert. The SBD recording quality isnīt bad, but it is difficult to hear the guitar very clear. The drum/percussion section on disk 2 is followed by a longer guitar part and well, i am not sure what that guitar playing is - sounds very strange to me. Like a newbie who is tuning is guitar for the very first time.

The funniest moment I think I've ever heard is from Led Zeppelin's famous and maybe most popular boot ever from the 21-June-1977 LA show, where, during Jimmy's Guitar Solo you hear a kid yell out above the din of the audience..."We've had the guitar lesson!" Some kid telling...no, yelling at Page to just "...get on with it already!" Absolutely priceless! First time I heard that I fell off the chair!

Garcia is playing like that on the above mentioned tune. There is more strange guitar playing on the SBD. It is similar to Zeppelinīs strange performance in Tempe 1977. Page is OFF for the whole show not knowing what he is doing. Could be the same thing with Garcia.
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Reaction Jackson



Joined: 05 Aug 2004
Posts: 286
Location: North NJ

PostPosted: Wed Mar 01, 2006 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pinguin, I can understand your scrutiny coming from the camp you sit in. However, the Dead covered so much territory and musical ground in their long (much longer than most rock bands!), rich history that there's bound to be some stuff that will get you goin! Personally, I've been a fan for years and years but I've never really gotten to head over heals for the mid 80's and on stuff. Sure, there are a few diamonds in the rough, but my real joys come from the period of the 70's. All the band members were playing through some really neat instruments and an ungodly sound system which really gave way to a great sounding show. As with most enthusiasts I, too, love turning people on to the band if I can. They certaintly did have their time and place in American (and rock?) culture. Now, I've studied music at school and lived with musicians for nearly 5 years. My musical tastes are pretty diverse - I listen to everything from bee-bop down through flat pickin' bluegrass. So, like I mentioned, there's bound to be something that you, at the very least, might find interesting. I would be more than happy to burn you a few 'live favorites' mix CD's of SBD recordings and ship them to you if you would be up for it. If not, that's cool too. It's always a joy finding new and interesting music, so I hope you have fun on the ride.

PS - I usually play 'Sugaree' for friends that want to get into the GD or have never heard them. While it may not be my absolute favorite tune, I think it's really representative of their style and playing.
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cogan



Joined: 26 Jul 2004
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Location: Antigua, West Indies

PostPosted: Wed Mar 01, 2006 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

57tele wrote:


Even if he weren't from Germany, you have to remember that the Dead were popular among only a very distinct subset of people here, too. Go try and tell folks on, say, a jazz guitar forum that Garcia was a great player. You'll get laughed out of the place. (the same way you'll get laughed out of a classical forum if you mention Steve Howe). Why? Apart from the inherent snobbery Smile the vast majority of people don't or didn't collect live shows, which is where Garcia really stretched out. Even then, there is the argument that his place in the guitar god pantheon is somewhat exaggerated by Deadheads.


No doubt. In just about every other guitar related forum, I find most folks seem to be dismisive, aggravated, or down right hostile when Garcia is mentiond. No point in going into the "good guitarist" debate since it's all fairly subjective. Just wanted to give a little insight into why his playing is considered famous (or infamous by some).

My comment about "most" of the folks here (meaning the Kimock discussion page) simply reflects my finding that people generally come at Steve via the road of the Dead (though that is forever changing as the Dead become a faded memory of a crowd constantly pulling in younger listeners). Let's face it, one has to put in an effort to find Steve Kimock and familiarity with live recordings is generally founded in The Dead or a few other bands. Of course there will be those who find their way here having never heard of the Dead, but I'm talking percieved statistics.
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plord



Joined: 06 Oct 2004
Posts: 139
Location: Charlotte, VT

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2006 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pinguin wrote:
Sorry, donīt have GD cds, but downloaded 4 or 5 shows from the 1989/1990 period plus the last two GD shows from 1995 but only listened to the last 1995 concert.


I don't think you will get much argument from the masses that this time period is not the best example of what Garcia can do. There were good shows in this period, but they were less frequent. I also don't much care for Jerry's tone after he abandoned the Fender Twin as a pre-amp sometime in the early 90's.

Because I am bored, let's run through a few of the guitars that Jerry used to get his sound. The rest of the elements-- from his hands and brain on one end to the buffered pre-amp->[Mutron, Distortion plus, Lexicon reverb, Vox wah, etc.]->Fender Twin->McIntosh solid state amp->JBL 130s-- stayed mostly constant for 25 years or so there. A good page with pictures of most of Jerry's guitars is at:
http://www.nii.net/~obie1/deadcd/garcia_guitars.htm

The first great era of Grateful Dead music (ALL of this is in my humble opinion!) was 69-70, when Jerry mostly played a Gibson SG. The canonical example of this sound is the Dark Star-> Saint Stephen ->Eleven -> Lovelight sequence from the _Live Dead_ album. The "Other One" opener from 3/1/1969 is also jaw-dropping. You can fetch that one...no you can't. I keep forgetting, archive org pulled all soundboard releases. Ok. Trust me on this one: go buy "Live/Dead".

The next great peak is '72-'74, probably the most creative improvisational period of the band's whole career. Jerry played a strat for some of this period, then got the "Wolf" guitar sometime in 1973. For an example of the Wolf, listen to this (streaming) show from June 18. 1974 Louisville KY; the opening Promised Land is a screamer: http://www.archive.org/audio/etree-details-db.php?id=12588

Fore pure balls-out rocking, and tight, tight, whole-band playing, 1977 is THE year for the Grateful Dead. The main guitar in Spring 77 was a custom Travis Bean with an aluminum neck; in the fall he brought Wolf back out. The Bean can be heard on the very very nice Help->Slip->Franklin from May 9, 1977:
http://www.archive.org/audio/etree-details-db.php?id=12280

I'm pretty sure he's playing the Tiger guitar on this Death Don't Have No Mercy from 10/9/89; but you should hear it even if I am wrong, it's an example of a late-era Garcia pouring everything he knows into two relatively brief, in-the-pocket, bluesy solos:
http://audio27.archive.org/1/audio/gd89-10-09.schoeps.howland.443.sbeok.shnf/gd89-10-09d3t01.wav_64kb.mp3

I don't know of any performance on Rosebud or Lighting Bolt that I can recommend.

Now. Who wants to go through and make a similar post with links for Steve's guitars? Smile
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mikecornett



Joined: 06 Aug 2004
Posts: 630
Location: Bakersfield,CA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2006 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I skimmed through that site, but didn't seem to see any pictures of his 3 single coil Travis Bean that, in my opinion, was one of his best sounding guitars. TB500 was the model number. It can be spotted on Dozin's site:




Looks like the site you posted claims those to be "MC1000 and MC 500"...MC refers to the Musician Series of Ibanez Artists, not the Travis Bean guitars.

In 76, he was playing this guitar along with his Mesa Mark I...Those are definately treats to listen to!

Here's a streaming .m3u file of a show from June of 76 with that setup:
Click here to load it
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craigwright



Joined: 18 Sep 2004
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2006 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those 89 Hampton shows...The Warlocks they were billed as...he was playing the Wolf, outfitted with Midi, one of the best shows of my life...broke out Dark Star, Attics, but The Death Don't Have no Mercy mentioned above, I can recall the......oh never mind.
That stuff was real.
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plord



Joined: 06 Oct 2004
Posts: 139
Location: Charlotte, VT

PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2006 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

craigwright wrote:
[...]but The Death Don't Have no Mercy mentioned above, I can recall the......oh never mind.


Now you got me curious! I wasn't there, I only have the tapes, but holy cow, there is so much to love about those two solos (and the similar ones from the Death Don't breakout at Shoreline earlier that year). It all just reeks of power.

And for all that, the Hampton version has this absolutely comical and Dead-typical moment, about halfway through the first solo, where Bobby tries to get a bit too clever and barges into the action with a really angular, ringing delayed figure. I mean, nobody else is even thinking about getting in Jerry's way; even Phil, who always mixed it up when the band was on, is just getting behind/below and pushing. Two bars later, the lead line crawls its way out of the cave to resume the dominant position. It cracks me up almost every time, on a level of awareness just a few notches below the constant amazement/awe level Smile

As you say: Real.
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Adam@Tungsten



Joined: 05 Jan 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No disrespect to the builder of this guitar, but it doesn't hold a candle to a real Cripe guitar.

Steve Cripe was building a guitar for Jerry in the summer of 1995. After Jerry passed, Steve decided to finish the guitar as a tribute to Garcia. The guitar he built had 64 pieces of mother of pearl inlay, 9-ply neck, 7-ply body with a 1/2" cocobolo top, piezo bridge pickups, three humbuckers, FX loop and the cover plate featured the planet Saturn with sterling silver rings.

That was the Tribute that Cripe intended.
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StephGilbert



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2016 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks a lot for this forum, it encourages me! check http://resumeperk.com/blog/resume-myths--discount-for-online-resume-help and get to know some myths about resume.
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