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Brozman on rhythm

 
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57tele



Joined: 29 Jun 2004
Posts: 714
Location: Durham, NC

PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 3:02 pm    Post subject: Brozman on rhythm Reply with quote

Was googling around for some insight into african rhythms and stumbled across a nice little article by Bob Brozman (a genuine wildman on various slides and steels). Consistent with a lot of the things I've heard Steve talk about over the years and thought some of you might find it interesting.

http://www.bobbrozman.com/tip_rhythm.html

A highlight for me:

Quote:
RHYTHM IN THE WEST

As a guitarist, I've observed that four European traditions have had negative impacts on modern guitar-playing, causing most contemporary guitarists to be quite weak rhythmically. The first tradition is the hierarchical way of organizing groups of musicians, with rhythm delegated to the lower ranks, and "lead" melody considered more important. The second tradition is the focus on notes and scales, considered to be far more important than rhythm. The third is the "sports" attitude, which considers speed to be the primary measure of musical virtuosity. The fourth tradition is attempted standardization of what is considered a "good tone" (timbre) for one's instrument. These four ways of handling music contribute to the fact that most guitarists spend 95% of their time practicing scales and 5% or less practicing groove and timbral changes. Ironically, manipulation of groove and tone provide far greater range of expression and create so much more impact on listeners that rapidly played scales start to seem like a lot of work for little gain.

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kimock



Joined: 20 Aug 2004
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boy, he nailed that one huh?

p's
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Frankenstrat



Joined: 11 Dec 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ha ha! Stupid Americans!

Guilty as charged!!
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alans



Joined: 14 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is definitely a weakness of mine, both conceptually and physically. For a long time I really neglected my right hand technique, and though I've been feeling better about it over the last few years I'm realizing that I really have a long way to go.

Does anyone have recommendations on areas/methods of study to strengthen that aspect of playing? Thanks!

alan
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alans



Joined: 14 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd like to expand on my plea for guidance a bit. Recently I noticed that Abstract Logix is selling an instructional DVD by John McLaughlin and Selvaganesh entitled Konokol, which from the product description I am assuming is the Indian classical method of counting through music. It's not in my budget right now, but I intend to pick it up at some point. My biggest problem isn't so much physical (although that can always use more work), but simply internalizing the count and divisions of the groove. Listening back to gigs, I seem to find at least one bit at each gig where I add an extra beat in a phrase and need to recover, which in these cases doesn't usually work out to a happy accident. I also feel that my rhythmic variation and swing can use some improvement. What I think that I need is some sort of conceptual tool set to practice counting and dividing things so that it will be more natural to me. As Brozman's comment suggests, this isn't something I've encountered much as I've learned to make music in the styles I'm most exposed to. Would a drum rudiments book help or would it be tough to glean the sort of information I want from that while skimming over drum-specific technique? It sounds like the Konokol DVD is a must for me, but I'm wondering what other mental discipline I can develop to help me get around this particular weakness of mine.

alan
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kingsleyd



Joined: 07 Aug 2006
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Location: live free & die state

PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2008 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I went to the NGW jazz summit several years ago and one of my teachers (Sheryl Bailey... google her!) made this point in a really interesting manner.

The first class on the first day, she said "OK, I had all these lessons drawn up but I'm gonna scrap them based on what I heard [at the jam on the opening night where everyone had a chance to get up and play on a few tunes with the "house band."]. You alll really need to work on your RHYTHMIC PHRASING."

"Here's today's excercise. I'm going to comp on a blues progression in F. Each of you in turn [25 players, give or take] is going to play a solo for two choruses. Here's the deal: you get ONE NOTE. F. It can be anywhere on the fretboard but the one you choose is it, the only note you can play."

So let's see, if all I've got is a single F somewhere on the fretboard, and I've got to play something for two choruses that doesn't sound totally fookin' lame in front of all these guitar players, what do I have to play with?

1. rhythm
1a. timbre

About 3 or 4 players out of 25 "got it" enough to do something. Most couldn't hold to the one note, let alone play something the least bit musical.

Great excercise. I still practice it regularly. Thanks, Sheryl!

Another teacher from that workshop [Adam Rafferty... another player worth Googling] showed me a couple of hand-drum patterns that he got (second-hand) from Dizzy Gillespie which is all about internalizing the 2-3 thing Brozman talks about in his article. It's sort of the "magic bullet" of African rhythm. I practice that a lot too.
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Frankenstrat



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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2008 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm...sounds very interesting. I'll have to give this a shot.
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Swain



Joined: 01 Jul 2008
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kingsleyd,

Could you tell us more about these "magic bullet" Rhythmic Patterns? I'd love to check them out.
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Swain



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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I gues that's a negatory? Razz
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plord



Joined: 06 Oct 2004
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Swain wrote:
Kingsleyd,

Could you tell us more about these "magic bullet" Rhythmic Patterns? I'd love to check them out.


I have no idea if this is what Kingsleyd was referring to, but, here is the "7 wheels of bembe" rhythmic guide that is imbedded deep in all latin and african percussion. It should give you some things to think about.

If you've got a looper, pick two of these rhythms and lay down 2 backing tracks. Then solo or comp on chords freely over, and try to shift your focus between the two rhythms or discover another strumming pattern that complements it.

There's a lot to pick up on just doing that.
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Swain



Joined: 01 Jul 2008
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You mena, just some random Rhythm Patterns?



"pick two of these rhythms"


Question

Or, were you menaing to post some examples of specific Rhythms?

Sounds like a cool Exercise, either way. It's actually how I often approach things, when I Comp. I look for a "hole" in the Rhythm, and try to put something additive into it.
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plord



Joined: 06 Oct 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Swain wrote:
You mena, just some random Rhythm Patterns?

"pick two of these rhythms"

Or, were you menaing to post some examples of specific Rhythms

Oh jeez, I fail at the internets. I meant to include this link:
http://www.rhythmweb.com/shed/bembe.htm

That ought to make things *much* more clear, eh?
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Swain



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2009 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

















Twisted Evil
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Swain



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2009 3:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool

Thanks! I'll be checking it out, first thing in the morning.
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Swain



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, I've got the first Pattern fairly comfortable feeling. So far.

I am going to keep playing through it every day. But, I'm also going to start working with the next Pattern.

This should be fun! Cool Rhythmic possibilities!

One thing that has helped: A Digital Delay.

I will play the Pattern into a Delay, and set it to just keep repeating this Loop. Over and over.
Then, I work with Improvising over it, etc.

So, once this 2nd. Pattern gets a little more comfortable, I may try Looping Pattern 1, and playing Pattern 2 over the top of it.

Then, move on through the rest of the Patterns. Eventually getting comfortable with all of them, and in different combinations.
This will take quite a while. But, that's cool. What else am I gonna do?

Actually, maybe I can finally Grok those Scott Kinsey Tunes!



Anybody else working with the Bembe Wheel?

Got any Tips, Discoveries, etc. to share?
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